Desk Posture: It’s Simple

National press, including the BBC, last week promoted a report advocating that office workers should sit in a ‘slouched back’ position. This is said to relieve pressure on the back.

Although this new recommended slouched position may unload the spine, most people have a tendency to slip down causing increased pressure on the posterior ligaments, resulting in back pain.

As Simone says, ‘The trouble is, this position will cause you to slouch eventually, stretching the posterior muscles of the lower back. It will almost certainly result in long term instability and support for your lumbar spine’

So what is the right way to sit? We advise tilting the base of your chair forward to put your pelvis in a good sitting position which makes the angle approximately 120 degrees. Do make sure that your screen and keyboard are aligned and directly in front of you. You should also get up and walk around every 30 minutes.

More information can be found about how we can help you at www.kaneandross.co.uk

ergonomics

Flat head syndrome

A flat head, also known as plagiocephaly can be caused by restrictions of movement in the neck, tightness of the neck muscles or compression at the base of the skull.

All of these mean that when your baby lies on its back to sleep, it will lie mostly on the same side or the same position. As the head is reasonably soft it may become flat.

Picture 2

What you may notice:

  • Your baby’s head looks asymmetrical
  • Either directly after delivery or a couple of weeks after birth you may notice a flat area developing.
  • Your baby feeds much better on one side
  • Your baby prefers to look one way and may not be able to turn its head fully to the opposite side.
  • Your baby sleeps to only one side.

Plagiocephaly is distortion of the head and cranial asymmetry and is often completely an avoidable problem if diagnosed and treated early. Look out for the above signs.

What can you do to help prevent plagiocephaly?

  • Stimulate or attract your baby’s attention to the side your baby avoids
  • When you are with your baby, lay it on its stomach to help lengthen and strengthen the neck.
  • When your baby is asleep, turn your baby’s head away from its preferable side.
  • Remember to always ensure your baby sleeps on its back.

Babies who are developing flat heads should be seen as quickly as possible – the sooner the problem is identified, the sooner the cause can be identified and treated.

What will an osteopath do?

The osteopath’s main aim will be to get full range of movement in the neck using muscle and fascia stretches, articulating the neck joints and using cranial techniques.

Treatment is gentle and babies are usually quite settled during treatment. With full range of neck movement, the head stops becoming flatter.

The osteopath will also give you exercise and postural advice to prevent the stiffness re-occurring.

More information can be found about how we can help you at http://www.kaneandross.co.uk

Our simple do’s & don’ts during pregnancy.

DO

Continue with your exercise programme until advised to stop or modify your routine – the fitter you are the easier your pregnancy and delivery will be!

Exercise to strengthen the back and pelvis and to open the ribs.

Lift carefully by bending your knees and limit the amount of weight you carry.

Keep your pelvis above your knees when sitting.

Lie on your side when relaxing on the couch.

Put a pillow between your legs and under your bump when lying in bed.

Take walks after dinner and have small meals in the evening if you are suffering from heartburn.

Get someone to look at your ergonomics if you work in an office.

DON’T

Stand in one position for too long, stick your bump out or wear high heels.

Cross your legs when seated.

Lift and twist putting additional strain on your back.

Sit for more than 20 minutes at a time.

Slouch when sitting on the couch.

Get a massage if you are in pain. Specialist help will be much more beneficial.

Drink coffee, tea or eat red meat, oranges or tomatoes if suffering from heartburn.