Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction

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SPD, also known as pelvic girdle pain (PGP), is defined as mild to severe pain over the pubic symphysis (a small midline joint connecting the two pubic bones), which sometimes radiates into the groin and inner thighs.

In pregnancy normal physiological changes occur to allow your baby to grow. The pubic symphysis that is normally 4-5mm increases in size by 2-3mm and the ligaments surrounding the joint become lax due to the surge of relaxin in the first trimester.

It is important to acknowledge that although pain in pregnancy is common, it is not normal! For a lot of women who experience SPD there is likely to be an undetected predisposing problem such as weak ‘core stability’ or pelvic floor muscles, previous injuries, muscle tensions or other structural imbalances. These underlying conditions combined with the increasing weight of the growing baby and softening of ligaments can affect the normal transference of weight and movement through the pelvis and hips.

How does osteopathic treatment help?

At Kane and Ross we believe from our many years of experience treating musculoskeletal pain in pregnancy that SPD can generally be treated effectively with osteopathic treatment and management.  If a patient is seen early enough within 16-22 weeks, we can normally get symptomatic relief after 4-5 treatments.

Using osteopathic techniques, we can…

  • Correct the imbalances that exist in the pelvis and lumbar spine (normally pre-existing dysfunctions and asymmetries)
  • Release any tension in the muscles and joints
  • Give advice about posture and exercise
  • Give advice on pelvic supports

PELVIC AND BACK PAIN IS NOT NORMAL DURING PREGNANCY. If you are experiencing pain, consult with an osteopath or manual therapist as soon as you can for treatment and further advice. Please do consider booking an appointment at Kane & Ross Clinics to discuss how we can help you: http://www.kaneandross.co.uk

For more information on SPD and advice on self-help strategies see the following article written by Simone Ross a specialist in musculoskeletal pain in pregnancy: http://doctoranddaughter.co.uk/spd/

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